Obladi Oblada

I just really like armpit hair.

lenaemery:

Black Isle Bakery

lenaemery:

Black Isle Bakery

obsessivecollectors:

The wall - Lena C. Emery

obsessivecollectors:

The wall - Lena C. Emery

fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery"Urban Nature" photograph series

fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery
"Urban Nature" photograph series

pradaphne:

Urban Nature by Lena C. Emery.

fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery"Practice" – A feature on Nude Yoga for the Spring/Summer 2014 Issue of The Gentlewoman

fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery
"Practice" – A feature on Nude Yoga for the Spring/Summer 2014 Issue of The Gentlewoman


photographed by Lena C.Emery for The Nude Label
fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery

fyeahwomenartists:

Lena C. Emery


S P L I T , 2014

exhibition-ism:

Geometric street art from EC13 in Granada, Spain.

(Source: bunnyhepburn, via vorpal-queen)

(Source: emilybador, via alowei)

lordbape:

datbootyisdam:

lordbape:

black people are valuable and important

Everyone has the very same amount of importance.

not today, satan. get off my post you demon bitch.

(via trustj)

newmuseum:

Suha Traboulsi, Untitled, 1943–49, on view on the Fifth Floor of “Here and Elsewhere.”
The works exhibited are from the 1940s, marking Suha Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.
Photos: Benoit Pailley 

newmuseum:

Suha Traboulsi, Untitled, 1943–49, on view on the Fifth Floor of “Here and Elsewhere.

The works exhibited are from the 1940s, marking Suha Traboulsi’s first departure from conventional methods of painting to more conceptual portraits illustrated using ink or even ballpoint pen on paper. In these works, brightly colored and oddly offset, fragmented shapes appear as if stenciled and digitally manipulated—in line with the minimalist aesthetic soon to prevail internationally, yet uncannily ahead of their time.

Photos: Benoit Pailley